2008 Polar Law Symposium

THE PURPOSE OF THE SYMPOSIUM  The first Polar Law Symposium occurred at the end of the International Polar Year. and its purpose was to bring together the

2008 Polar Law Symposium in Akureyri

THE PURPOSE OF THE SYMPOSIUM

 The first Polar Law Symposium occurred at the end of the International Polar Year. and its purpose was to bring together the world’s leading scholars in international law and policy to identify emerging and re-emerging issues in international law and policy that relate to the Polar Regions (Arctic and Antarctica), and to map out a research agenda for future research beyond the International Polar Year.

THE 2008 POLAR LAW SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM

'Words of welcome'

PROFESSOR THORSTEINN GUNNARSSONRector, University of Akureyri

'Opening Keynote Address'

H.E. MR. ÓLAFUR RAGNAR GRÍMSSON, President of the Republic of Iceland.

'Welcome to Akureyri'

SIGRUN BJÖRK JAKOBSDOTTIR, Mayor of Akureyri

'Welcome from the Faculty'

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR SIGURÐUR KRISTINSSON, Dean, Faculty of Humanities and Social Science, University of Akureyri

‘Challenges for the Changing Polar Environments’

DR BAKARY KANTE, Director of the Division of Environmental Law and Conventions, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

‘Setting the scene-the purpose of the symposium and what we hope to achieve’

PROFESSOR A.H. ZAKRI, Director, United Nations University- Institute of Advanced Studies.

THEME I-CHALLENGES FOR THE PROTECTION OF BIODIVERSITY AND WILDERNESS IN THE POLAR REGIONS

So Much Law so Little Protection’

PROFESSOR MALGOSIA FITZMAURICEQueen Mary, University of London, United Kingdom.

‘From the new Geopolitics of Resources to Nanotechnology: Emerging Challenges of Globalism in Antarctica’

DR. ALAN D. HEMMINGS, University of Canterbury, New Zealand and University of Tasmania, Australia.

‘Protecting Polar Wilderness Values: Just a Western Philosophical Idea or a Useful Concept for Polar Law and Policy Development?’

DR KEES BASTMEIJER, Tilburg University, The Netherlands.

‘Terrestrial Area Management in Polar Regions: Applying the Ecosystem-Based Approach to the Coalface of Climate Change’

PROFESSOR MICHAEL JEFFERY QC, Centre for Environmental Law, Macquarie University, Australia.

‘Polar Bears, Penguins and the United States Endangered Species Act: The Role of Domestic Wildlife Law in Polar Biodiversity Protection'

MS KASSIE SIEGEL, Centre for Biological Diversity, USA.

‘Bioprospecting in Antarctica and the Arctic. Common challenges?’

DR DAVID LEARY, United Nations University- Institute of Advanced Studies, Japan.

THEME II-SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN RIGHTS

‘Land claims and self government arrangements in Arctic Canada in light of International Human Rights Norms’

PROF. NIGEL BANKESUniversity of Calgary, Canada.

‘Human Rights in the Arctic’

PROFESSOR GUDMUNDUR ALFREDSSONUniversity of Akureyri, Iceland

‘Indigenous self-government and the right to land and natural resources’

PROFESSOR ASBJÖRN EIDENorwegian Centre for Human Rights, Norway

‘Sustainable Human Rights and Governance? The Quest of an Arctic Entity in Transition’

Joint paper by DR NATALIA LOUKACHEVA, University of Akureyri, Iceland and PROFESSOR MATTHEW GARFIELD, University of Akureyri, Iceland and Former Chair of the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, Canada.

‘Implementing Sustainable Development in the Arctic: What Principles Should Guide Environmental Governance in Traditional Areas of Indigenous Peoples?’

PROFESSOR DONNA CRAIG, Centre for Environmental Law, Macquarie University, Australia.

THEME III-ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE IN THE POLAR REGIONS

‘Governance of Arctic Marine Shipping: A Preview from the Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment (AMSA)’

PROFESSOR DAVID VANDERZWAAGDalhousie University, Canada.

‘Charting a Sustainable Course through Changing Arctic Waters’

DR ROBIN WARNER, Australian National Centre for Ocean Resources and Security, University of Wollongong, Australia.

‘Protecting the Arctic environment: the interplay of global and regional regimes’

DR OLAV SCHRAM STOKKE, Fridtjof Nansen Institute, Norway.

‘Legal Issues Relating to Navigation through Arctic Waters’

PROFESSOR TULLIO SCOVAZZI, University of Milan, Italy.

‘Creating a New Future for the Arctic: Is a New Framework Convention the Solution?’

DR TATIANA SAKSINAArctic Governance Officer, WWF International Arctic Programme

'Protecting Antarctica from non-indigenous species: the imperatives and the impediments’

SANDRA POTTER, School of Geography & Environmental Studies, University of Tasmania, Australia.

‘Polar governance: a bird's-eye view’

DR ARIE TROUWBORSTNetherlands Institute for the Law of the Sea, Utrecht University.

'The outer continental shelf: opportunities for marine environmental protection in polar regions’

MR DANIEL OWENBarrister, Fenners Chambers, Cambridge, United Kingdom

THEME IV-EMERGENT AND RE-EMERGING JURISDICTIONAL ISSUES IN THE POLAR REGIONS

‘Understanding what's at stake: mapping and presenting jurisdictional issues in the Polar regions'

DR MARTIN PRATT, Director of Research International Boundaries Research Unit, Department of Geography, Durham University, United Kingdom.

‘Warm Waters and Cold Shoulders: Jostling for Jurisdiction in Polar Oceans’

PROFESSOR ROSEMARY RAYFUSE, Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales, Australia.

‘Do the continental shelf claims challenge the commons regimes in the Polar regions?’

PROFESSOR TIMO KOIVUROVANorthern Institute for Environmental and Minority Law, Arctic Centre, University of Lapland, Finland

‘Reactions and overreactions to the Russian flag on the seabed at the North Pole’

MR ANDREW SERDYUniversity of Southampton, United Kingdom

‘Arctic State-Changes: Self Interest or Common Interest’

PROFESSOR PAUL BERKMAN, Fulbright Distinguished Scholar, Cambridge University.

WORKSHOP SESSION AND DEVELOPMENT OF RECOMENDATIONS

Based on the papers presented and subsequent discussion the workshop session addressed these questions:

(1) What are the main emerging and re-emerging issues in international law and policy relating to the Polar Regions warranting international action?

(2) Are the current international legal and policy systems able to address these issues?

(3) What issues require immediate action by the international community?

(4) What issues will require action by the international community in the longer term?

(5) What steps should countries take to address these issues?

(6) Which of these issues warrant further detailed research by legal scholars and other disciplines?

Division